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"The better part of one's life consists of his friendships."
- Abraham Lincoln

The Politicians

The Politicians

Mr. Lincoln was notable for his ability to maintain cordial relations with Democrats as well as Whigs and Republicans.

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The Lawyers

The Lawyers

"During my life I have been acquainted with very many able lawyers, and I have no hesitation in saying that Lincoln was the greatest trial lawyer I ever saw," wrote Shelby M. Cullom.

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The Boys

The Boys

Mr. Lincoln's popularity with "the boys" was not tied to his indulgence in their vices. Indeed, he eschewed gambling, smoking and drinking. Mr. Lincoln managed to be one of the boys without being exactly like the boys.

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The Cabinet

The Cabinet

Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet was not composed of friends - at least not initially. It was composed of major Republican figures with whom Mr. Lincoln's personal acquaintance was very limited.

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The Officers

The Officers

"The responsibility of office weighed heavily upon the President, but never overwhelmed him; yet the rebuke of a friend caused him the keenest pangs."

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Members of Congress

Members of Congress

Mr. Lincoln understood the mentality members of Congress from his one term there in 1847-1849. Several of those with whom he had served from Illinois played a continuing role in his life.

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The Preachers

The Preachers

Mr. Lincoln and the preachers of his acquaintance spoke a common language - the language of the Scriptures. It did not make their relationships easy.

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The Sons

The Sons

"When the soldiers in the field or their folks at home spoke of 'Father Abraham,' there was no cant in it," wrote Carl Schurz. "They felt that their President was really caring for them as a father would..."

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The Women

The Women

"The truth is I have never corresponded much with ladies; and hence I postpone writing letters to them, as a business which I do not understand," Lincoln wrote Mrs. M. J. Green.

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The Journalists

The Journalists

The relationship between Mr. Lincoln and journalists was generally symbiotic. It was natural because the line between journalism and politics was a thin one in the mid-19th century.

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